Finn Broman and Andreas Broqvist at Refactored Games in Denmark

Today it is Finn Broman’s (SP11) and Andreas Broqvist’s (SP11) turn to share their experiences as trainees at Refactored Games in Denmark.

Andreas Broqvist (SP11) and Finn Broman (SP11)

Andreas Broqvist (SP11) and Finn Broman (SP11)

Tell us about Refactored Games

Refactored games is a small game studio based in Denmark currently working on the game Unclaimed World. 

How did you end up at The Game Assembly in the first place?

Both of us got one of the advertisement flyers, and we wanted to work with something that we were passionate about: Games. So we applied.

How have you experienced your years at The Game Assembly?

Very double-edged. We both learnt a lot and met a lot of great people, but the two years were very stressful and packed with assignments. It was normal for us to work 13 hours a day, and at times it was too much to handle.

How did you end up at Refactored Games?

Both of us found out about the game company on our school’s Meet and Greet and applied for an internship after that.

Do you feel that the knowledge and experience you got at The Game Assembly was enough to make your internship as interesting and developing as possible?

Yes.

Do you feel that you were sufficiently prepared to be involved in game production at Refactored Games?

Yes.

What advice would you give to those who want  to apply to The Game Assembly?

If the person wants to apply as a programmer we would tell the person to think twice, if the person is absolutely certain that game programming is the thing for them, and doesn’t mind being without spare time for two years then it is a good option. If you do apply, you need to have complete focus and determination to keep up.

Thank you Finn and Andreas. :)

Share Button

Kristoffer Olsson, Christian Lood and Mikael Nettelblad at Visual Dreams

Today it is Kristoffer Olsson’s (SP11), Christian Lood’s (SP11) and Mikael Nettelblad’s (SG11) turn to share their experiences as trainees at Visual Dreams. The game company Visual Dreams is one of The Game Assembly’s success stories, It was started by three The Game Assembly students 2010 in Norrköping. The brave crew was Kristofer Boman (SP08), Harald Johansson (SP08) and David Marquardt (SG08) and we keep them close in our network. Next time we see them is at Meet and Greet here in Malmö the 29th of April.

Kristoffer Olsson (SP11), Christian Lood (SP11) and Mikael Nettelblad (SG11)

Kristoffer Olsson (SP11), Christian Lood (SP11) and Mikael Nettelblad (SG11)

Now, Kristoffer, Christian and Mikael, tell us about Visual Dreams

VisualDreams was founded in 2010 in Norrköping, Sweden, by former TGA students. It’s a small studio that has created mobile games such as Capcom Published Herman the Hermit and self published hits Slam Dunk Basketball 1,2 and Linkies.

How did you end up at The Game Assembly in the first place?

Christian: I knew I wanted to study game programming so I looked at all the different educations in the country. After asking around aswell as paying a visit to The Game Assembly during an open house I was confident it was the best option out there. Mikael: From word of mouth, I met someone who had studied at a different school, he recommended The Game Assembly. Art and games being things I love, it sounded appealing, so I gathered a portfolio from loose work and applied.It went smoothly for a shot in the dark. Kristoffer: I was interested in programming and wanted to learn more, The Game Assembly was recommended by my brother.

How have you experienced your years at The Game Assembly?

Christian: Alot of frustration and lack of sleep. Its no doubt the most challenging thing I’ve done but at the same time it was also extremely rewarding and fun. I got to do and learn so many new things is such a short amount of time. Mikael: Fantastic. My time at the Game Assembly have been hard and stressful but very rewarding in the end. I love the focus on practical work wich I think is the best possible way of learing. And I really feel this education has opened a new world for me. Kristoffer: Very tough but I’ve learned a lot.

How did you end up at Visual Dreams?

Christian: I met with them during the meet and greet and got a good impression of them. I contacted them a couple of days later and after an interview over the phone i was offered the internship. Mikael: I met with the guys from Visual Dreams at the 2013 Meet and Greet. I applied shortly after and soon enough I had my internship at visual dreams secured. Kristoffer: We met at the Meet and Greet event held by the school, where I got interested and applied.

Do you feel that the knowledge and experience you got at The Game Assembly was enough to make your internship as interesting and developing as possible? / Do you feel that you were sufficiently prepared to be involved in game production at Visual Dreams?

Christian: Absolutely, while attending The Game Assembly alone wont guarantee that you will be prepared, if you work hard and put everything you got into it , it certainly provides you with the tools to be as prepared as you could possibly be. The teachers are very proffessional and you will learn so much from your peers aswell. Mikael: Absolutely, before I started at The Game Assembly, besides dabbling with CAD and Blender i had no knowledege and experience of working with 3D or game development whatsoever. And now, after my time at the school I feel rather confident in my skills, Which have helped plenty at my internship. Kristoffer: Yes.

What advice would you give to those who want to apply to The Game Assembly?

Christian: Be really sure that this is what you want, and that you are willing to give up anything for it. If you are not willing to essentially give up all your free time, friends and family for the coming 2 years then you need to rethink if this is really for you. However if you can do that I can assure you it’s most certainly worth it. Mikael: I would advice anyone who applies to The Game Assembly to be ready for some serious hard work, and to show full commitment and dedication to what you work on. You will spend most of your waking life working, so make sure this is what you want to do. Kristoffer: Be prepared to give it your all, most of your time will be required. Thank you Kristoffer, Christian and Mikael. :)

Share Button

Daniel Nilsson at Cape Copenhagen

Today it is Daniel Nilsson’s turn to share his experience from his internship at Cape Copenhagen in Denmark.

Daniel Nilsson (LD11)

Daniel Nilsson (LD11)

Tell us about Cape Copenhagen

Cape Copenhagen is an indie game developer located in, as the name suggests, Copenhagen. It has a team about 30 people. They mostly make games for other clients and often kids games but they also have some own projects.

How did you end up at The Game Assembly in the first place?

I had sent an application to another school in the same field when I got some information sent by mail to me. I thought it sounded better then the school I had applied to so I decided to send an application. Some months later I went to an interview and it seems to have gone ok.

How have you experienced your years at The Game Assembly?

Though and fun. Stressful and awarding.

How did you end up at Cape Copenhagen?

After meeting them at an event arranged by the school they contacted me and asked if I wanted to do my internship there and I gladly accepted.

Do you feel that the knowledge and experience you got at The Game Assembly was enough to make your internship as interesting and developing as possible?

Yes.

Do you feel that you were sufficiently prepared to be involved in game production at Cape Copenhagen?

Yes.

What advice would you give to those who want  to apply to The Game Assembly?

To be absolutely sure that they want to work with games, if not then they probably shouldn’t. And to work hard but also to do other things in their spare time to keep sane :)

Tack Daniel. :)

Share Button

Joakim Ohlander at Yager

This time it is Joakim Ohlanders turn to share his experiences as a game programming trainee at Yager in Germany.

” – My name is Joakim Ohlander and I’m a programmer :).”

Joakim Ohlander (SP11)

Joakim Ohlander (SP11)

Tell us about Yager

Yager is an independent AAA studio located in east Berlin and was founded in 1999 by a couple of guys from the former GDR. The studio now consists of over a hundred employees from fifteen different countries and is an always increasing number. The company have released two games (Yager, Spec Ops: The Line) and is currently working on an amazing unannounced AAA game for next gen consoles using unreal engine.

How did you end up at The Game Assembly in the first place?

I ended up at The Game Assembly after being tired of studying Chinese at university and wanted to try doing something else. I heard of  TGA from an old podcast that I used to listen to where this school among a few others got mentioned. I always loved video games and working with them sounded cool so I decided to write an application.

How have you experienced your years at The Game Assembly?

The latin verse “per aspera ad astra” (Through hardships to the stars) summarizes all the experiences I had during my time at TGA. There were so many late nights filled with crazy situations that pushed me harder then I ever thought myself of being capable of. It was a time filled with laughter, hope, knowledge and dreams that I will have with me for the rest of my life.

How did you end up at Yager?

It started with me doing a formal application at their website which afterwards lead to two long skype interviews where I was asked questions regarding everything from code to other stuff. After this I got an offer and I accepted it :)!.

Do you feel that the knowledge and experience you got at The Game Assembly was enough to make your internship as interesting and developing as possible?

The experience I got from The Game Assembly served me well when working at Yager. I improved upon a lot of areas during my stay at TGA, such as the ability to give and receive feedback, handling high amounts of stress and working together with people that come from different walks of life. Because of this, I felt I was well prepared to work in a professional environment developing video games.

The topics covered by the different programming courses at TGA gave me enough knowledge to be a contributing coder at Yager. I was treated as a normal employee from day one and I felt that I was able to contribute a lot to the game we are currently developing.

What advice would you give to those who want  to apply to The Game Assembly?

Make sure that before you press the application button that you are certain in that making video games is something you want to do. If you are only interested in an education that is simple and do not require a lot of determination, my suggestion to you would be to not press the application button. However, if you feel like you have the drive then please apply as TGA is a great tool to educate yourself in whatever discipline you desire in regards to game development.”

Thank you Joakim. :)

 

Share Button

Erik Nilsson at Massive Entertainment – A Ubisoft studio

Let us present Erik Nilsson (SG11) who has been doing his internship as a game artist at Massive Entertainmet – a Ubisoft studio. We asked him questions about how he ended up in the game industry and he also shares advice to the people who wants to apply to The Game Assembly.

Erik Nilsson (SG11)

Erik Nilsson (SG11)

Tell us a bit about Massive Entertainment – a Ubisoft studio

Massive has been making games ever since the companies inception in 1997. With hits like Ground Control, World in Conflict and Far Cry 3 under its belt the studio is currently working on one of the most anticipated games this year: Tom Clancy´s The Division. The studio has currently over 300 employees. During my internship I worked as a concept artist, helping Massive bring the next generation of gaming here, It´s been a really cool journey.

How did you end up at The Game Assembly in the first place?

Ever since I knew that I wanted to become an artist I have been determined to get into the gaming industry as fast as possible. I got the tip of applying to The Game Assembly from an old teacher of mine, so when I graduated from my upper secondary school I immediately sent in my application, I got in as a reserve on third place.

How have you experienced your years at The Game Assembly?

They were fun, quite hectic and challenging, but worth it. I worked every day for two years, both during work hours and my free time trying to improve my craft.

How did you end up at Massive Entertainment – a Ubisoft studio?

It’s a funny story really, I originally got in at Southend, a small indie studio in Malmö. But only weeks after I had signed with Southend the studio got bought up by Massive. Since I had already signed they were nice enough to let me tag along.

Do you feel that the knowledge and experience you got at The Game Assembly was enough to make your internship as interesting and developing as possible?

Yes, but as a concept artist I don’t think I would have been as successful without the time I spent watching tutorials and improving myself. Not to mention what I learned from friends, forums and mentors outside school. I do think that the school allows you as a student to really get into the industry and grasp the workflow and pipelines though.

As for my development during the internship, well I felt that I got really lucky with the team I was dropped in. During my internship I was surrounded by wonderful people that was very professional, knowledgeable and had that very special kind of humor that won´t ever leave me the same. Much laughter and merry fun was had during my days there.

What advice would you give to those who want  to apply to The Game Assembly?

Well, In my opinion, try things out beforehand. Game development is hard, It might not be for everyone even though it might seem like a really cool profession. Be sure that you like to make games, not just play games. At the end of the day my big passion is making art, and I can still enjoy doing that when I get home.

With that said, making games is also very rewarding, so I recommend that you grab some friends and join a game jam, or make mods, or do 3D, or code your own game or just paint for the hell of it. You will only become better at something if you put in some time and try to become better at it.

Thank you, Erik. :)

Share Button